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June Cho, PhD, RN

Associate Professor
Phone: 
(919) 684-5292
Office: 
2027 Pearson Building

Dr. Cho joined the DUSON faculty in July, 2015. She came to Duke from the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB), where she was an assistant professor in the School of Nursing and a senior scientist at the Civitan International Research Center. At UAB, she taught evidence-based practice, research methods, and nursing informatics courses within the school's undergraduate and graduate programs, and taught applied statistics within PhD program. Her clinical experience, which spans 20 years, has been primarily in pediatric nursing, although she also served as Director of Nursing Education in St. Mary’s Hospital, an affiliate of Catholic University in Seoul, Korea.

Dr. Cho completed her MSN at Yonsei University in South Korea, earned her PhD at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill in 2005, and completed a two-year post-doctoral fellowship at UNC-Chapel Hill in 2007. She successfully completed two pilot studies, and following completion of an R21 project, her research team was awarded a new R01 project (“Testosterone and Cortisol Levels in Infant Health and Development”) in 2014. In this research study, she is investigating associations of steroid hormonal (testosterone and cortisol) levels with very-low-birthweight (VLBW) infant health and growth outcomes, mother-infant interactions, and infant cognitive/motor/language development.

Education

  • PhD - University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill
  • MSN - Yonsei University, South Korea
  • BSN - Catholic University (South Korea)

Research Interests

• Gender differences in infant health and development, mother-infant interactions, and infant cognitive/motor/language development among very-low-birthweight (VLBW, birthweight less than 1,500 gm) infants
• Associations between steroid hormonal (testosterone and cortisol) levels and VLBW infant health and growth outcomes, mother-infant interactions, and infant cognitive/motor/language development
• Associations of steroid hormonal (testosterone and cortisol) levels with maternal and infant psychophysiological outcomes, e.g., maternal depressive symptoms and infant socioemotional problems
• Effects of pre- and post-natal glucocorticoids on VLBW infant health and developmental outcome
• The ratio of testosterone to cortisol in mother-infant interactions and maternal and infant psychophysiological outcomes
• Validation of the use of blood and saliva samples for maternal and infant psychophysiological outcomes between LC-MS and EIA procedures
• Role of steroidal hormones in an animal model of autism spectrum disorders
• A comprehensive measurement (multi-prong approach) to early evaluation of neurobehavioral development problems
• Epidemiologic study of an early evaluation for neurobehavioral development problems among VLBW infants, e.g., role of steroidal hormones in infant health, behavior, and development.

Awards and Honors

  • 2014 || Honored Alumni, The Catholic University, College of Nursing
  • 2009 || Dean's Scholar Award, 2009-2010, University of Alabama-Birmingham, College of Nursing

Areas of Expertise

  • Pediatric Nursing

Representative Publications

  • 2015 -- PubMed # : 26152823 Cho, J. and Su, X. and Phillips, V. and Holditch-Davis, D. Association of Maternal and Infant Salivary Testosterone and Cortisol and Infant Gender With Mother-Infant Interaction in Very-Low-Birthweight Infants. Res Nurs Health. October, 2015 38(5); 357-68
  • 2015 -- PubMed # : 25954021 Cho, J. and Su, X. and Phillips, V. and Holditch-Davis, D. Associations of Maternal and Infant Testosterone and Cortisol Levels With Maternal Depressive Symptoms and Infant Socioemotional Problems. Biol Res Nurs. May, 2015, Epub ahead of print
  • 2014 -- PubMed # : 23639953 Cho, J. and Holditch-Davis, D. Effects of perinatal testosterone on infant health, mother-infant interactions, and infant development. Biol Res Nurs. April, 2014 16(2); 228-36
  • 2012 -- PubMed # : 22633533 Cho, J. I. and Carlo, W. A. and Su, X. and McCormick, K. L. Associations between salivary testosterone and cortisol levels and neonatal health and growth outcomes. Early Hum Dev. October, 2012 88(10); 789-95 PMC3601806
  • 2012 -- Jukkala, A. and Meneses, K. and Azuero, A. and Cho, J. and McNees, P. Development of the knowledge of fertility and fertility preservation scale Nursing: Research and Reviews. April, 2012 2 1-7
  • 2011 -- PubMed # : 21720217 Su, X. and Azuero, A. and Cho, J. and Kvale, E. and Meneses, K. M. and McNees, M. P. An introduction to tree-structured modeling with application to quality of life data. Nurs Res. September, 2011 60(4); 247-55 PMC3136208
  • 2011 -- PubMed # : 20920000 Cho, J. and Holditch-Davis, D. and Miles, M. S. Effects of gender on the health and development of medically at-risk infants. J Obstet Gynecol Neonatal Nurs. February, 2011 39(5); 536-49 PMC2951302
  • 2008 -- PubMed # : 18226158 Cho, J. and Holditch-Davis, D. and Miles, M. S. Effects of maternal depressive symptoms and infant gender on the interactions between mothers and their medically at-risk infants. J Obstet Gynecol Neonatal Nurs. April, 2008 37(1); 58-70 PMC2718685
  • 2007 -- PubMed # : 17889727 Cho, J. and Holditch-Davis, D. and Belyea, M. Gender and racial differences in the looking and talking behaviors of mothers and their 3-year-old prematurely born children. J Pediatr Nurs. October, 2007 22(5); 356-67
  • 2004 -- PubMed # : 15185245 Cho, J. and Holditch-Davis, D. and Belyea, M. Gender, ethnicity, and the interactions of prematurely born children and their mothers. J Pediatr Nurs. June, 2004 19(3); 163-75

Grant Funding (Selected)

  • Testosterone and Cortisol Levels in Infant Health and Development

    National Institutes of Health
    1-R01HD076871-03
    06/2014 to 05/2019

    Project Goal: This longitudinal study was designed to assess the significance of testosterone and cortisol levels between genders in: (1) infant health and growth, (2) mother-infant interactions, and (3) infant cognitive/motor/language development among very low birthweight (VLBW, birth weight less than 1,500g) infants through the first two years of life corrected for prematurity. This collaborative study involves a multidisciplinary team comprised of an academic research nurse investigator, neonatologist, pediatric endocrinologist, developmental-behavioral pediatrician, developmental psychologist, and pediatric nurse. The team members will integrate biochemical (laboratory research), behavioral (observational method), and developmental science. A long-term goal of the study is to identify the role of testosterone and cortisol in health and development of VLBW infants.

  • Perinatal Testosterone in Infant Health, Mother-Infant Interactions and Development

    NICHD
    R21-HD066186
    07/2010 to 06/2012
    Role: PI

    Project Goal: In this exploratory study we investigated the levels of testosterone and cortisol as biological and environmental factors affecting gender differences in VLBW infants. The saliva samples at postnatal period (before 40 weeks of postmenstrual age) were collected from 62 mother-VLBW infant pairs to examine the associations of the salivary testosterone and cortisol levels with: (1) neonatal health and growth outcomes, (2) mother-VLBW infant interactions, and (3) infant cognitive/motor/language development up to 6-month corrected age for prematurity. Maternal depressive symptoms and infant socioemotional problems, characteristics of mothers and infants, and days of saliva collection after birth were statistically adjusted.

  • Effect of Infant Gender and Mother-Infant Interactions on infant Cognitive and Motor Development

    NIH/NINR
    T32 NR007091-11
    09/2005 to 08/2007
    Role: Trainee, post-doctoral fellow

    Project Goal: This study analyzed restricted large-scale data from the US government to examine the effects of infant gender and mother-infant interactions on infant development after controlling for characteristics of mothers and infants. The sample size was over 10,000. It included all different birthweights (normal birthweight, low birthweight, and very low birthweight) of infants.

  • Effect of Infant Gender on the Interact¬ions between Mothers and Their Medically At-Risk Infants

    NIH/NINR
    T32 NR07091-06
    09/2001 to 08/2003
    Role: Trainee, pre-doctoral fellow

    Project Goal: This PhD dissertation study used a longitudinal and comparative research design to examine the effects of infant gender on mother-infant interactions after adjusting for maternal depressive symptoms and infant health outcomes. Three sets of data on medically at-risk infants were analyzed. They were: (1) prematurely born infants, (2) medically fragile infants, and (3) infants seropositive for HIV.

Friday, November 11, 2016

Kudos to June Cho for the submission of her Translational Accelerator Program application to the Duke CTSI, project entitled "Causal Relationship of Testosterone with Infant Health and Development using Mouse Model." This proposal requests funding ($150,000) for a one-year period with a start date of May 1, 2017.

Friday, January 29, 2016

June Cho was recently selected to participate in the 2016 Duke course on Leadership Development for Researchers (LEADER). Her class includes 39 outstanding scientists from fields in 14 different School of Medicine departments, as well as the Schools of Nursing, Engineering, and Duke-NUS in Singapore.

The course will be held in April.