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Janice C. Humphreys, PhD, RN, FAAN

Professor
Associate Dean for Academic Affairs
Phone: 
(919) 613-7162
Office: 
2019 Pearson Building

Janice Humphreys, PhD, RN, FAAN, is Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. She came to Duke in 2013 from the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) School of Nursing, where she was Professor and Vice-Chair for Academic Personnel in the Department of Family Health Care Nursing. Dr. Humphreys earned bachelor’s degrees in both nursing and psychology at Purdue University, and then completed her M.S. in pediatric nursing at UCSF with support from a National Health Service Corps Scholarship. She subsequently contributed two years of service as a pediatric nurse practitioner at the Guilford County (North Carolina) Health Department then moved to Detroit, where she taught and completed her PhD at Wayne State University. She taught for six years at Eastern Michigan University and then returned to UCSF as a member of the faculty in 1994. Her UCSF career was distinguished by excellence in research, teaching, and community service, and by leadership in shared governance responsibilities of the School of Nursing, the UCSF campus, and the University of California system.

Dr. Humphreys’ research focuses on the health effects of intimate partner violence on women and their children and is rooted in over 30 years of nursing practice with these vulnerable populations. Initially her research described the breadth and depth of multidimensional responses to violence (including resilience) in battered women and their children. Her most recent studies address chronic pain, depression, lifetime trauma exposure, and posttraumatic stress disorder in abused women as well as the relationship between intimate partner violence and telomere length, a measure of cell aging. She is recognized nationally and internationally as an expert on intimate partner violence, and has an extensive record of collaborative research in this field with colleagues from all over the world.

As a long-standing member of the UCSF Center for Symptom Management, Dr. Humphreys has also been instrumental in development of the Theory of Symptom Management. Interest in this theory and its implication for intervention research has grown, and she has presented on this subject recently in Switzerland and China. She has taught courses at both the master’s and doctoral levels on symptom management, qualitative research methods, theory development, and family violence.

Dr. Humphreys’ publications include over 70 peer-reviewed research articles and book chapters, several of which have won national or international awards. She is the co-editor (with Jacquelyn Campbell) of Family Violence and Nursing Practice, a text developed to serve as a resource for undergraduate, graduate, and practicing health care professionals, which is now in its 2nd edition (2011). For many years she served on the board of the Nursing Network on Violence Against Women International. She is a founding member of the Enfermeras del Anillo del Pacifico en Investigación sobre Violencia de Pareja [Nursing Research on Pacific Rim Intimate Partner Violence]. Dr. Humphreys is a charter member and former Board Member of the Academy on Violence and Abuse. In 2006, she was inducted as a Fellow of American Academy of Nursing, and she has served as Co-chair for the Academy’s Expert Panel on Violence.

Academic Program Affiliations

  • Doctor of Nursing Practice Program
  • Master of Science in Nursing Program

Education

  • PhD - Wayne State University
  • MS - University of California, San Francisco
  • BS (Nursing) - Purdue University

Awards and Honors

  • 2013 || Nominated for CTSI Consultant of the Year Impact Award, UCSF Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI)
  • 2012 || Excellent Presentation (Poster) Award, 9th International Conference of the Global Network of WHO Collaborating Centres for Nursing and Midwifery, Kobe, Japan.
  • 2012 || Honorable Mention for Gibbs Prize, Women’s Health Issues
  • 2011 || Hong Kong University Research Output Prize, Hong Kong University
  • 2009 || Excellence in Nursing Research Award, Nursing Network on Violence Against Women International
  • 2008 || Member, American Academy of Nursing, Edge Runner Award winning Nursing Research Consortium on Violence and Abuse
  • 2008 || Nominated for Outstanding Faculty Mentorship Award, University of California-San Francisco
  • 2008 || Richard L. Sowell Award for Outstanding Article, Journal of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care (JANAC)
  • 2007 || UCSF School of Nursing Centennial Wall of Fame, University of California-San Francisco
  • 2006 || Inducted as Fellow, American Academy of Nursing
  • 2006 || Vice Chair Expert Panel on Violence, American Academy of Nursing
  • 2005 || Nominated for UCSF Distinction in Teaching Award, University of California-San Francisco
  • 2004 || Nominated Chancellor’s Award for Public Service, University of California-San Francisco
  • 2004 || Nominated, Chancellor's Award for the Advancement of Women, University of California-San Francisco
  • 2001 || Nominated, Outstanding Faculty Mentorship Award, University of California, San Francisco (UCSF)
  • 2001 || Recognized at Celebrating Women Faculty, University of California - San Francisco
  • 2000 || Virginia Kelly CRNA Scholar, American Nurses Foundation
  • 1997 || Volunteer of the Year, Riley Center (battered women’s shelter)
  • 1994 || Book of the Year Award, American Journal of Nursing
  • 1985 || Outstanding Alumni Award, Purdue University Nursing Alumni Organization
  • 1984 || Book of the Year Award, American Journal of Nursing
  • 1984 || National Research Service Award, Division of Nursing, NIH (5F31NU05708)
  • 1984 || Volunteer of the Year, Interim House (battered women’s shelter)
  • 1982 || Thomas C. Rumble Fellowship, Graduate School, Wayne State University
  • 1978 || Sigma Theta Tau, Inducted

Areas of Expertise

  • Family Health
  • Health Disparities
  • Research Methods
  • Women's Health

Areas of Interest

Intimate partner violence
Battered women
Symptom management
Lifetime trauma exposure
PTSD
Spirituality
Chronic pain
Chronic stress
Telomeres
Maternal-child interaction
Resilience
Nurse-managed care

Representative Publications

  • 2015 -- Seib, C. and Lee, K. and Humphreys, J. and Anderson, D. Predictors of mental health in midlife and older Australian women: A multilevel investigation Health Care for Women International. September 25, 2015 Epub ahead of print
  • 2015 -- Openshaw, M. and Thompson L. M. and Bernal de Pheils, P. and Mendoza Flores, M. E., & Humphreys, J. Childhood trauma is associated with depressive symptoms in Mexico City women Pan American Journal of Public Health (Revista Panamericana de Salud Pública). June, 2015 37(4/5); 308-315
  • 2014 -- PubMed # : 25392389 Burton, C. W. and Halpern-Felsher, B. and Rehm, R. S. and Rankin, S. H. and Humphreys, J. C. Depression and Self-Rated Health Among Rural Women Who Experienced Adolescent Dating Abuse: A Mixed Methods Study. J Interpers Violence. November, 2014, Epub ahead of print
  • 2014 -- PubMed # : 24843836 Park, V. M. T. and Hayes, D. K. and Humphreys, J. Disparities in intimate partner violence prenatal counseling: setting a baseline for the implementation of the Guidelines for Women's Preventive Services. Hawaii J Med Public Health. 73(5); 137-43
  • 2014 -- PubMed # : 24400870 Seib, C. and Whiteside, E. and Humphreys, J. and Lee, K. and Thomas, P. and Chopin, L. and Crisp, G. and O'Keeffe, A. and Kimlin, M. and Stacey, A. and Anderson, D. A longitudinal study of the impact of chronic psychological stress on health-related quality of life and clinical biomarkers: protocol for the Australian Healthy Aging of Women Study. BMC Public Health. January, 2014 14(1); 9
  • 2014 -- PubMed # : 24439946 Seib, C. and Whiteside, E. and Lee, K. and Humphreys, J. and Dao Tran, T. H. and Chopin, L. and Anderson, D. Stress, lifestyle, and quality of life in midlife and older Australian women: results from the stress and the health of women study. Womens Health Issues. Jan/Feb, 2014 24(1); e43-52
  • 2014 -- PubMed # : 24470704 Lee, K. A. and Gay, C. and Humphreys, J. and Portillo, C. J. and Pullinger, C. R. and Aouizerat, B. E. Telomere length is associated with sleep duration but not sleep quality in adults with human immunodeficiency virus. Sleep. 37(1); 157-66
  • 2013 -- PubMed # : 24315252 Taylor, L. E. and Stotts, N. A. and Humphreys, J. and Treadwell, M. J. and Miaskowski, C. A biopsychosocial-spiritual model of chronic pain in adults with sickle cell disease. Pain Manag Nurs. December, 2013 14(4); 287-301
  • 2013 -- PubMed # : 24200224 Seib, C. and Anderson, D. and Lee, K. and Humphreys, J. Predictors of mental health in post-menopausal women: Results from the Australian healthy aging of women study. Maturitas. December, 2013 76(4); 377-83
  • 2013 -- PubMed # : 24131412 Burton, C. W. and Halpern-Felsher, B. and Rehm, R. S. and Rankin, S. and Humphreys, J. C. "It was pretty scary": the theme of fear in young adult women's descriptions of a history of adolescent dating abuse. Issues Ment Health Nurs. November, 2013 34(11); 803-13

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Grant Funding (Selected)

  • Nurse Faculty Loan Program

    Health Resources and Service Administration
    1-E01HP28758-01-00
    07/2015 to 06/2016
    Role: Project Director

    Project Goal: The Duke University School of Nursing (DUSON) offers two programs to help address the nurse faculty shortage: the Master of Science in Nursing (MSN), with a major in nursing education, and the Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP). The MSN nursing education major, established in 2001, has graduated 167 nurse educators, including 12 in 2014. The DNP program enrolled its first cohort of students in fall 2008, and as of December 2014, 186 have completed the program with another 37 expected to complete the program in May 2015. During academic year (AY) 47 students participated in the Nurse Faculty Loan Program (NFLP) including 23 DNP students. Twenty-nine graduates are currently employed as nurse faculty and are eligible for the loan deferment program. The major objectives of this proposal are to: 1) To recruit qualified applicants to the Nursing Education major (MSN) and DNP programs who seek to become nursing faculty; 2) To enroll educate and retain students in the Nursing Education major (MSN) and DNP programs who seek to become nursing faculty; and 3) Graduate MSN Nursing Education major and DNP students who also complete the Nursing Education courses in order to address the nursing faculty shortage. The goal for AY is to continue NFLP funding for 14 students currently part of the program and to add 25 new students to NFLP support. Thus, we intend to enroll 39 students in the NFLP for 2015-2016.

  • Adapting the PTSD Family Coach application for women who have experienced intimate partner violence

    DUSON Small Grant Program
    06/2015 to 05/2016

    Project Goal: The purpose of this research is to adapt an existing smartphone application (i.e., PTSD Family Coach) for women who have experienced IPV in order to provide them with free and easy access to information about IPV, PTSD, stress assessment, tools to manage stress, safety planning, and sources of IPV and PTSD support.

  • Nurse Faculty Loan Program

    Health Resources and Service Administration
    1E01-HP27045-01-00
    07/2014 to 06/2015
    Role: Project Director

    Project Goal: The Duke University School of Nursing offers two programs geared to help address the nurse faculty shortage, the Master of Science in Nursing (MSN), with a specialty in Nursing Education, and the Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP). The MSN Nursing Education specialty, established in 2001, has graduated 151 nurse educators, including 5 in 2013. The Doctor of Nursing Practice program enrolled its first cohort of students in fall 2008, and as of December 2013, 144 have completed the program with another 52 expected to complete the program in May 2014. The School of Nursing had 31 students participating in the Nurse Faculty Loan Program (NFLP) this past academic year (2013-2014) as of December, 2013, including 25 DNP students. Thirty-two graduates are currently employed as nurse faculty and are eligible for the loan deferment program. Our commitment to preparing nurse educators is strong with enrollment growing across the two programs. We aim to continue to fund 27 students who are continuing in the NFLP and project 18 new students to request NFLP support for the upcoming year. Thus, we intend to enroll 45 students in the NFLP for 2014-2015.

  • Lifetime Trauma Exposure, Chronic Pain, Depression, and PTSD in Mexican Women: A Pilot Study

    UC MEXUS Faculty Grants
    01/2012 to 12/2013
    Role: PI

    Individuals exposed to one or more traumatic events over their lifetime also report poorer health, more symptoms, and a greater number of chronic health conditions than nonexposed individuals even when controlling for demographic characteristics. In this pilot study we propose to conduct a cross-sectional study with 100 community-based women in Mexico City who have ever experienced trauma in order to better understand their chronic pain, depression, and PTSD. This step is necessary because it is well known that posttraumatic symptom manifestations are often culturally bound and knowledge of these factors and how they manifest in community-based women is a necessary preliminary step if we are to develop culturally sensitive interventions.

  • Bridging Interdisciplinary Research Careers in Women’s Health (BIRCWH) K-12 Program

    NIIH
    5K12HD052163
    08/2010 to 06/2015
    Role: Mentor

    Project Goal: The program’s aims are to: 1) recruit a superb and diverse group of early career Women’s Health researchers; 2) provide them fiscal and individually-tailored training and mentoring; 3) build upon our existing program by broadening it to specifically target important Women’s Health topics that are understudied; 4) strengthen and integrate models of multidisciplinary research and develop researchers who foster linkages across disciplines and institutions; and 5) to promote the prominence of and resources allocated to Women’s Health research by mentoring BIRCWH Scholars and alumni in academic process and leadership. I serve as a Co-Lead Mentor of the Violence and Traumatic Stress initiative with Tom Neylan, MD.

  • Symptom Clusters in Oncology Patients Receiving Chemotherapy

    NIH/NCI
    5R01 CA134900
    07/2009 to 05/2014
    Role: Co-Investigator

    This study addresses two important aspects of symptom cluster research, namely 1) the identification of symptom clusters in oncology outpatients who are receiving chemotherapy and 2) the identification of subgroups of oncology outpatients based on their experience with four highly prevalent symptoms (i.e., pain, fatigue, sleep disturbance, and depression). Based on prior work by the Dual-PIs, Aouizerat and Miaskowski, it is anticipated that two subgroups of patients will be identified (i.e., patients who experience high levels of all 4 symptoms (approximately 10% of the sample) and patients who experience low levels of all 4 symptoms (approximately 43% of the sample). A two-stage genome wide association study will be done with the DNA from these two subgroups to identify genomic markers for these two distinct groups of patients. In addition, lifetime stressors will be examined in order to explore the “gene by environmental” factors that may play a role in these two subgroups. I will take a leadership role in the analysis and interpretation of these data.

  • Trauma Exposure and the Health of Women in Three Countries

    UCOP Pacific Rim Research Grant
    06/2008 to 03/2011
    Role: Principal Investigator

    Project Goal: The purpose of this study is to describe the number, type, and timing of trauma exposures in community-based samples of women in the United States, Colombia, and Hong Kong and to examine the relationship between trauma exposure and physical and psychological health. The proposed project builds upon established partnerships among a cadre of nurse-researchers (“Enfermeras del Anillo del Pacifico en Investigación sobre Violencia de Pareja” [EAPIVP]) studying the health effects of intimate partner violence for women of the Pacific Rim.

  • Trauma, PTSD and Symptoms in Sheltered Battered Women: A Pilot Test of the SensorBedTM

    UCSF School of Nursing Special studies funds
    05/2007 to 05/2009
    Role: Principal Investigator

    Project Goal: The purpose of this interdisciplinary pilot study was to determine the feasibility of research using innovative technology, the SensorBed, to examine the relationships among trauma exposure, PTSD, and symptoms in sheltered battered women. It is well known that IPV disproportionately affects women and numerous studies have concluded that women who experience IPV have poorer overall health, significant risk of PTSD, and more symptoms than women who have not experienced IPV. A growing body of research now suggests that the sleep disturbances of trauma survivors may be predictive of later onset of PTSD. Dr. Steve Woodward developed the SensorBed TM, an innovative, zero-burden device for measuring an array of sleep parameters over time. Together with Dr. Kathryn Lee, we sought to determine if the pilot study methods are reasonable and acceptable as an initial step toward a larger exploratory study. Unfortunately, the SensorBed technology was not sturdy or reliable enough to be used in the shelter setting. Further development of the technology is needed.

  • Intimate Partner Violence, Lifetime Trauma Exposure, PTSD & Symptoms

    UCSF School of Nursing Special studies funds
    04/2007 to 03/2008
    Role: Principal Investigator

    Project Goal: With a community-based sample of women who have experienced IPV, the specific aims of this pilot study are to: 1) Describe their IPV characteristics, lifetime trauma exposure, PTSD, chronic pain and depressive symptoms, including the associations among these variables; 2) Estimate the contribution of IPV to chronic pain, after “controlling” statistically for lifetime trauma exposure, and the presence of PTSD; 3) Estimate the contribution of IPV to severity of depressive symptoms, after “controlling” statistically for lifetime trauma exposure, and the presence of PTSD; 4) Estimate the interaction of IPV and PTSD on chronic pain, and on depressive symptoms; and 5) Estimate the interaction of lifetime trauma exposure and PTSD on chronic pain, and on depressive symptoms. The results of this study provide a more representative community-based estimate of the relative contribution and interaction among the variables than has previously been reported and will serve as a basis for a larger study.

  • Telomere Shortening in Formerly Abused Women

    UCSF Clinical & Translational Science Institute Strategic Opportunity Support Center Award
    04/2007 to 12/2007
    Role: Principal Investigator

    Project Goal: The purpose of this cross-sectional pilot study was to extend the findings of Epel et al. (2004) by exploring the relationship between perceived stress and cell senescence in a community-based sample of women with a range of levels of IPV, from none to severe. Our hypothesis was that perception of more chronic stress would be associated with a decrease in telomere length. To test this hypothesis, the primary aim was to describe the strength of the relationship between level of perceived stress and cell senescence (telomere length) in a sample of 112 women; 66 formerly abused women and 46 controls who report no history of abuse. I wrote the proposal and had primary responsibility for all aspects of the project with the exception of the laboratory data analysis and interpretation. Telomere length was significantly shorter in women who experienced IPV compared to controls. Having children and length of time in the abusive relationship accounted for 17% of the variance in telomere length. These findings suggest a link between IPV exposure, duration of IPV-related stress in women, and molecular mechanisms that regulate cellular aging.

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Friday, April 14, 2017

PhD students Deanna Befus and Rachel Hirschey and PhD alumna Megan Winkler presented their work at the annual meeting of the Society of Behavioral Medicine in San Diego, Calif.

​Befus' presentation is entitled "A systems-thinking, problem-solving approach to study migraine self-management and empowerment in socially vulnerable women." Janice Humphreys was a contributor for this project.

 

 

 

 

Wednesday, January 11, 2017

U.S. News & World Report (USNWR) released its 2017 rankings of the best online graduate nursing programs, and Duke University School of Nursing (DUSON) is recognized as the third best program in the United States as well as the third best program for veterans.

Friday, September 16, 2016

From the Center for Nursing Research...

Great News! Richesson and Jang Receive Awards

Thursday, May 26, 2016

Duke University School of Nursing’s Master of Science in Nursing Program is now accepting applications for the first adult endocrinology specialty for nurse practitioners in the United States.

Friday, November 20, 2015

DUSON and its faculty, staff, students and alumni were very visible throughout the 43rd Sigma Theta Tau International 43rd Biennial Convention in Las Vegas held earlier this month. Here are the highlights:

  • DUSON and Dean Broome were acknowledged during the opening plenary session by President Hester Klopper for helping to fund students from around the world to attend the STTI convention.

Monday, March 9, 2015

Janice Humphreys has been selected as a Distinguished Alumni Award recipient by the Colleges of Health and Human Science at Purdue University.

Tuesday, June 17, 2014

Janice Humphreys has received an award for her HRSA proposal entitled "Nurse Faculty Loan Program." This award is for a one-year period, awarded July 1, 2014 to June 30, 2015. This project was awarded at $541,297 for the one-year project period.

Friday, January 24, 2014

Janice Humphreys has been named a Golden Graduate of the Purdue School of Nursing. Janice, an alumna of the Purdue BS program, was selected due to her upholding a tradition of excellence. She will be honored during the School’s 50th Anniversary Gala event to be held April 12

Wednesday, January 8, 2014

Janice Humphreys published an article entitled "Telomere length is associated with sleep duration but not sleep quality in adults with human immunodeficiency virus" in SLEEP. Abstract

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