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Randolph Submits Administrative Supplement Proposal

Wednesday, June 20, 2018

Kudos to Schenita Randolph for the submission of an administrative supplement proposal on the Duke funded NIH Center for AIDS Research award to Dr. Kent Weinhold. The administrative supplement is entitled "A Qualitative Study to Examine the Feasibility and Acceptability of a Beauty Salon-Based Intervention to Increase Awareness and Uptake of PrEP among Black Women Living in the United States South." This proposal requests funding for a one-year period with a start date of July 1, 2018. 

The purpose of this administrative supplement is to determine the feasibility and acceptability of developing a beauty salon-based intervention to promote awareness and uptake of Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PreP) among Black women living in the Southeastern U.S. Using a community engagement approach to ensure cultural and social congruence of a future beauty salon-based intervention, this qualitative descriptive study will examine the feasibility and acceptability of collaborating with salons to disseminate PrEP information.

In this project, we will explore the feasibility and acceptability among Black female customers of stylists serving as lay health educators, and receiving PrEP information in a beauty salon setting. We will also explore how social networks of Black women in beauty salons can be leveraged in HIV prevention to promote the uptake of PrEP, and determine perception of Black women on strategies to address medical mistrust in the context of PrEP uptake. In Aim 1, we will assess the perceived feasibility of using beauty salons and stylists to disseminate information about PrEP to Black women customers. In Aim 2, we will determine how the social networks of Black women in beauty salons can be leveraged in HIV prevention to promote the uptake of PrEP and medical trust. In Aim 3, we will explore the perceptions of Black women on receiving an HIV prevention intervention promoting PrEP in the beauty salon setting and strategies to address medical mistrust in the context of PrEP uptake. The overall contribution of this proposal aligns with the NINR's scientific focus to promote health and prevent illness through the development of evidence-based, personalized interventions to promote wellness among individuals and across populations. Using existing social networks, this project will not only engage a trusted setting and individuals to reach Black women with PreP information, but it will also allow us to glean important insights into aspects of mistrust that can be used to inform a future intervention related to HIV prevention.