2019 Health Equity Academy II Scholars

2019 HEA II Scholars

Duke University School of Nursing is committed to investing resources in recruiting and graduating nurses from diverse populations, in an effort to build a nursing workforce that reflects society. To reach that goal, DUSON is happy to welcome the 2019 Health Equity Academy II Scholars. The Academy for Academic and Social Enrichment and Leadership Development for Health Equity—more commonly known as the Health Equity Academy II (HEA II)—was created to support minority students in the ABSN program.

Duke University School of Nursing and the Health Equity Academy II welcome (from left to right): Taisir Idries, Kiara Dandridge, Antwan Garner, Unique Whitehurst, Illiyah Phyllis Edwards, Kiana Michelle Myrick and Breanna Gambrell.

“The Academy is an innovative program designed to address the gap in nursing workforce diversity and increase the Scholars’ understanding and responses to equity in nursing practice, research and leadership,” says Brigit Carter, PhD, MSN, RN, CCRN, associate professor, associate dean for diversity and inclusion and HEA II program director.

She adds, “It’s crucial that our Scholars and all students understand the skills and values associated with managing and reducing the impact of social determinants of health. By the end of their time at DUSON, they’ll have the ability to achieve and sustain a social environment that embraces differences, while promoting multicultural understanding and growth.”

HEA II is a nursing workforce diversity grant funded by the Bureau of Health Professionals, Health Resources and Services Administration, Department of Health and Human Services (D19HP25902). This project is committed to the development of minority nurse leaders with an understanding of and commitment to addressing the relationship between social determinants of health, health access, health disparities and health equity.

The seven HEA II Scholars will be on campus participating in the Pre-entry Immersion in Nursing (PIN) program from June 4 through June 28. During this four-week experience, Scholars will live on-campus and work with Duke faculty, advisors and mentors to develop an enhanced understanding of social determinants of health. 

“The Academy provides socialization, decreasing the risk of homesickness and loneliness, and the PIN program focuses on creating a solid team structure, ensuring Scholars have a reliable core group of peers as a strong resource,” says Carter. 

“Additionally, Scholars are provided the opportunity to meet ABSN faculty and staff increasing familiarization, decreasing anxiety and increasing the likelihood they will seek out faculty in times of stress or difficulty. They are also provided scholarship and stipend support to offset potential financial barriers,” she adds.

Upon successful completion of the PIN program, all seven of the HEA II Scholars will enter the Pathways to Success in Nursing program and matriculate into the DUSON ABSN Fall 2019 cohort. Pathways to Success in Nursing provides academic and social supports to HEA II Scholars throughout the ABSN program.  

 

 

 

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